Last edited by Mezilkis
Monday, July 20, 2020 | History

2 edition of Glass and glazes from ancient Egypt. found in the catalog.

Glass and glazes from ancient Egypt.

Brooklyn Museum.

Glass and glazes from ancient Egypt.

by Brooklyn Museum.

  • 311 Want to read
  • 40 Currently reading

Published in [Brooklyn] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Egypt.
    • Subjects:
    • Glassware, Ancient.,
    • Glassware -- Egypt.,
    • Glazes.

    • Edition Notes

      ContributionsRiefstahl, Elizabeth.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsNK5107 .B7
      The Physical Object
      Pagination24 p.
      Number of Pages24
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL6027205M
      LC Control Number48001636
      OCLC/WorldCa1712827

      Egyptian art and architecture - Egyptian art and architecture - Plastic arts: In Egypt pottery provided the basic material for vessels of all kinds. Fine wares and many other small objects were made from faience. Glass arrived late on the scene and was used somewhat irregularly from the New Kingdom onward. Generally speaking, Egyptian pottery had few artistic pretensions.   The majesty and splendor of ancient Egypt were largely the result of the remarkably advanced technological skills developed by its artisans and craftsmen. This fascinating, comprehensive, and detailed study of ancient Egyptian technology meticulously describes the extent to which these workers and other Egyptians developed and used the land's vast published in .

      Ancient Egyptian Roman Glass Mosaic Egypt Antique Fragment Beads Rare Authentic $ ANCIENT ROMAN GLASS & EGYPTIAN CARNELIAN & MUMMY BEAD EARRINGS; BC - AD. This book aims to provide sufficient data to ground and intelligent appreciation of such remains of stained and painted glass older than as are still to be found in ancient buildings. The connection between glass-painting and the other arts ancillary to architecture is touch upon with special reference to their common objects and use.

      It was adorned with glass and precious stones and deemed as a fine instance of Amarna Period art. The amazing thing is the glaze of the metal was intact even after 3, years when it was excavated. 2. The Egyptian Book of the Dead. A noted ancient Egyptian funerary text, The Egyptian Book of the Dead was used till 50 BC from around BC. You searched for: egyptian glass! Etsy is the home to thousands of handmade, vintage, and one-of-a-kind products and gifts related to your search. No matter what you’re looking for or where you are in the world, our global marketplace of sellers can help you find unique and affordable options. Let’s get started!


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Glass and glazes from ancient Egypt by Brooklyn Museum. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Ancient Egyptian Glass and Glazes in the Brooklyn Museum First Edition by Elizabeth Riefstahl (Author)Cited by: Glass and glazes from ancient Egypt.

book. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Brooklyn Museum. Glass and glazes from ancient Egypt. [Brooklyn] (OCoLC) Document Type: Book.

GLASS AND GLAZES FROM ANCIENT EGYPT. By Mrs Elizabeth Riefstahl. Brooklyn Museum, 24 pp., 36 figs. 40 cents. - Volume 24 Issue 95 - D. HardenAuthor: D. Harden. Brooklyn Museum. Department of Ancient Art. Ancient Egyptian glass and glazes in the Brooklyn Museum.

[Brooklyn] Brooklyn Museum [©] (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Elizabeth Riefstahl; Brooklyn Museum. Department of Ancient Art. Ancient glass objects and vessels of the Mediterranean region occupy a prominent position within the collection of classical antiquities at the Yale University Art Gallery.

Indeed, Yale’s holdings of ancient glass, built up over seven decades, rank among the largest and best in the Size: 1MB. Hassan Ahmed Ali, popular as Hassan Hodhod, one of Egypt's few remaining glassblowers. Credit: Dina Mansour Text and Photos by Dina Manousr Deep into the small Hassan Ahmed Ali, popularly known as Hassan Hodhod, has inherited the craft from his father and grandfather, who have taken up the craft since the Ottoman Empire.

Egyptian faience was very widely used for small objects from beads to small statues, and is found in both elite and popular contexts. It was the most common material for scarabs and other forms of amulet and ushabti figures, and used in most forms of ancient Egyptian jewellery, as the glaze made it smooth against the skin.

Larger applications included cups and bowls, and wall tiles, mostly. The earliest discovery of glazed pottery came from the 8th or 9th century B.C.

or even earlier. Early glazing was discovered in China, Egypt, Mesopotamia and Greece. Each country seemed to have a particular style of glazing that was preferred. Egyptian glazing was largely alkaline based, as was that used in China and Mesopotamia.

The amphora, in Egypt as in all ancient countries was the most common and most useful vase, was made in all sizes, from the three-inch oil or perfume container to the immense jar of three or four feet in height, for holding water, wine, oil, or grain.

But in general, archaeological evidence suggests that the first true glass was made in coastal north Syria, Mesopotamia or ancient Egypt. Because of Egypt's favorable environment for preservation, the majority of well-studied early glass is found there, although some of this is likely to have been imported.

Its presence in Egyptian blue indicates that quartz sand, rather than flint or chert, was used as the silica source.

This contrasts with the source of silica used for glass-making at Qantir (New Kingdom Ramesside site), which is quartz pebbles and not sand.

This is a study of the procurement and processing of raw materials employed by the ancient Egyptians over the five millennia of the Predynastic and Pharaonic periods (c. BC). During this time, not only were there variations in the preferred materials for particular types of artefacts, but also gradual processes of technological change, and the industries of the Chalcolithic period Reviews: 3.

Egyptian faience is a self-glazing ceramic: salts in the wet paste come to the surface as it dries and develop a glaze when it is fired in the kiln. This is called efflorescence glazing. Metal oxides in the paste color the glaze. A treasure trove of information about Ancient Egypt presented in a seek-and-find format, with a magnifying glass included (because “every Egyptologist needs a magnifying glass”).

This fun and interactive book includes 16 scenes depicting daily life for the Ancient Egyptians, each with hundreds of miniature cartoon-style figures going about. Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for Ancient Egyptian Glass and Glazes in the Brooklyn Museum at Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users.5/5.

From the inception of faience in the archaeological record of Ancient Egypt, the colors of the glazes varied within an array of blue-green hues. Glazed in these colours, faience was perceived as substitute for blue-green materials such as turquoise, found in the.

Glazed Steatite: An Investigation of the Methods of Glazing Used in Ancient Egypt. Author(s): M. Tite and M. Bimson glass phase of the glaze which appears light. Egyptian glass is among the finest of the ancient world. Yet how did the ancient Egyptians make it.

New work, at the world’s earliest-excavated glass making factory in the A-list site of Tell el-Amarna, is unravelling the mysteries. During firing, the alkaline components (e.g., the salty crust formed with the efflorescence method) react with the ground quartz, copper oxide, and lime to form a glaze.

Most ancient faience objects have glaze covering their entire surface, and most show no traces that indicate how they were supported in.

The University of Chicago Press. Books Division. Chicago Distribution Center. Glass was first produced deliberately and consistently in Mesopotamia sometime between c. and BC. There is some scattered evidence for prior glassmaking, largely in the form of beads (see, e.g., Grose,p.

45), but much of this material was most likely the accidental by-product of other pyrotechnological processes, namely, faience production and metal smelting.The blue beads are called Egyptian glass.

Egyptian glass is an early form of ceramic glaze. As people learned more about glass and glazes, chemicals were added as colorants, to melt glass at lower temperatures and make it more flexible for more forming techniques.Ancient Egyptian Pottery.

The Egyptians were one of the first cultures in the world to create pottery. They developed an excellent farming-based civilization and it is thought that they made pottery as a way to store grains and food items.